Hive Five: One-Word Bands Who Own Google

Slug and Ant of the hip hop act Atmosphere. Photo: Matt Blum

The term “google-proof” is applied to products, bands and movies whose names are so common that a simple web search will lead a person to a bunch of pages that have nothing to do with the thing in question. (Tip: Don’t name your band “Porn.”) Sometimes, however, a band can rise above their non-descript name and appear first in a Google search for an otherwise common word. Here are five bands who overcame the challenge to take the coveted top spot on the search engine.

1. Bush

Given that the band hasn’t released a hit record in at least a decade, this one is unlikely. But somehow Gavin Rossdale and whoever he’s playing with these days have managed to snag the word “Bush” on Google, despite the best efforts of both shrubbery and two U.S. Presidents.

2.  Atmosphere

Since the gaseous layer we call the atmosphere is absolutely vital to the survival of life on this planet, it’s kind of surprising that a Minnesota underground hip-hop duo is way more popular on the Internet.

3.  Clutch

If your transmission goes out you can, of course, find information about how to replace this important part online. But first, you’ll have to learn about the Maryland stoner-rock band.

4.  Cake

Cake is delicious! You eat it on your birthday, hip food trailers sell it in ball form, reality shows are dedicated to it — but the Internet, long a haven for the sort of nerds who adore the sardonic Sacramento rockers moderately well-known for going “The Distance” and questioning how you afford your “Rock ‘N’ Roll Lifestyle,” prefers the band to the sugary confection.

5.  Why?

The Internet is full of difficult-to-answer questions, but before you get to things like “Why Are Nerds Unpopular?” or “Why Won’t God Heal Amputees?”*, you will first find the Anticon indie rockers who brought us “The Hollows.” It’s a way more satisfying result than a bunch of half-baked philosophy.

*Actual lower-page results for the search term “why?”

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